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Step 3: Explore available homeschooling methods

by Mary Ann Kelley

Get Started Homeschooling: Step 3 - Explore available homeschooling methodsOne of the best things about homeschooling is that you don’t have to recreate school at home; in fact, in most cases you shouldn’t recreate school at home. You have the freedom to allow your children to learn in ways that aren’t possible in an institutional setting, so learn more about what might work best for your family. Consider how your children learn. Home is not school and does not need the same structure. There are many homeschooling methods; take some time to look into how each works.

While you are exploring, take the opportunity for your children and yourself to go through a period of deschooling before you jump into homeschooling, especially if your child was previously in public school. There is an adjustment period that a child (and often the parent) goes through when leaving school and beginning homeschooling.

To fully benefit from homeschooling, a child has to let go of the school culture as the norm. This is deschooling, and it is a crucial part of beginning homeschooling after a period of time spent in a classroom. This period is a great time to explore the homeschooling methods and learning styles if you haven’t already done so.

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