Get access to our homeschool planner and more! Sign Up

Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson: An American Hero (NASA)

Katherine Johnson is known for being a human "computer" at NASA during the race to space. As an African American during the time of Jim Crow laws, she worked in the West Area Computer Unit at the Langley Research Center. The unit was a segregated work area with its own bathrooms and cafeterias. Johnson was eventually transferred to the flight research division at Langley, where she worked on the math behind how to get humans to space and back at what became NASA in 1958. Johnson was the subject of the 2016 book Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly. A movie based on the book was released the same year. In 2017, a new research facility was named for her: the Katherine G. Johnson Computational Research Facility at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

Born - August 26, 1918

Died - February 24, 2020

Filter These Results

To filter the results, check one or more boxes and press submit:
  • Y—Young (PreK-3rd)
  • M—Middle (4th-6th)
  • O—Older (7th-12th)
  • T—Teacher Resources

NOTE: To remove all filters, leave all of the boxes unchecked and press submit

Text over illustration of sky and clouds - Time4Learning and Fun for everyone: Online education for PreK-12th
Looking for a curriculum that makes learning fun? You'll find it in Time4Learning's PreK-12 grade online homeschool curriculum.
Text Time4Learning and rotating graphics for math, science, social studies, and language arts

Katherine Johnson Biography  (M,O)
From Biography.com

From Hidden to Modern Figures  (M,O)
Video featuring Katherine Johnson from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

She Was a Computer When Computers Wore Skirts  (M,O)
A NASA History article from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Katherine Johnson: A Lifetime of STEM  (M,O)
From the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Katherine Johnson: The Girl Who Loved to Count  (M,O)
A feature article from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Katherine Johnson, 'hidden figure' at NASA during 1960s space race, dies at 101  (M,O)
A Washington Post obituary article dated Feb 24, 2020

The Black Female Mathematicians Who Sent Astronauts to Space  (M,O)
Article from Mental Floss, an online encyclopedia.

Katherine Johnson  (M,O)
Notable Calculations, Technical Reports, Videos, and Photos for Katherine Johnson from the NASA Langley Research Center

Katherine Johnson, NASA Mathematician And An Inspiration For 'Hidden Figures,' Dies  (M,O)
Obituary heard on the Morning Edition of NPR February 24, 2020

'Hidden Figures': How Black Women Did The Math That Put Men On The Moon  (M,O)
An author interview heard on All Things Considered September 25, 2016 on NPR

Katherine Johnson Biography  (M,O)
Biography by Margot Lee Shetterly

Katherine Johnson Interview: NASA's Human Computer  (M,O)
NASA Langley pioneer Katherine Johnson talks about her life and her work at NASA, where she was known as the "human computer." She discusses the highlights of her career, including calculating John Glenn's flight trajectory.

Katherine Coleman Goble Johnson  (M,O)
Article from the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of St Andrews, Scotland

Katherine Johnson National Visionary  (M,O)
From The National Visionary Leadership Project

The Woman the Mercury Astronauts Couldn't Do Without  (M,O)
From Nautilus science magazine.

West Virginian of the Year: Katherine G. Johnson  (M,O)
From the Charleston Gazette newspaper article dated Dec 26, 2015

On Being a Black Female Math Whiz During the Space Race  (M,O)
A New York Times article by Cara Buckley dated Sept. 5, 2016

TheHomeSchoolMom may be compensated for any of the links in this post through sponsorships, paid ads, free or discounted products, or affiliate links. Local resource listings are for information purposes only and do not imply endorsement. Always use due diligence when choosing resources, and please verify location and time with the organizer if applicable. Suggestions and advice on TheHomeSchoolMom.com are for general information purposes only and should never be considered as specific to any individual situation, nor are they a diagnosis or treatment advice for any kind of medical, developmental, or psychological condition. Blog posts represent the views of the contributor and do not necessarily reflect the views of other contributors or the publisher. Full terms of use and disclosure

As featured on

US News & World Report, Forbes, KQED, HuffPost, AL.com, Money, Healthline Parenthood, Family Education, Parents, Scholastic