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Waiting For Unschooling To Work

by Shay Seaborne

Remarkably, the best homeschooling advice I received came when my first child was a baby. My friend Barb, an experienced homeschooling mom who loaned me stacks of Home Education Magazine and Growing Without Schooling, told me that to homeschool I only had to "provide a rich environment, involve children in everyday living, and help find answers to their questions." That sounded very simple, and it is; the challenge is in trusting that such a plan is enough. Continue reading »

Eclectic Homeschooling

by THSM Contributor

I am now beginning my fifteenth year in homeschooling so I feel well qualified to tell you how our homeschool has evolved into the eclectic approach. My oldest daughter, Laura, graduated from homeschool high school in 2002 and from a one year Bible college in 2003.However, I am still homeschooling my son Stephen, aged 15 for tenth grade and my daughter Mary aged 10 for fourth grade.

Over the years I have tried many different curriculums and eventually I just learned to stick with what works for both myself and my children.  I also learned that there is no such thing as the “perfect” curriculum.  Each curriculum has its pros and cons for you as the mom, and from the kids persepctive and of course from a cost standpoint. I do know this,  kids will learn if you are faithful  do school work daily, regardless of the curriculum. Continue reading »

The Moore Formula

by THSM Contributor

Dr. Raymond Moore and his wife Dorothy Moore are sometimes called the grandparents of the modern home schooling movement. For over 50 years they have been educational professionals, and for the last 30 years have been sharing their research and their “formula” for successful home schooling, a program that is low-cost, low stress, and yet brings high-achievement. Continue reading »

Movies: A Resource for Homeschooling Parents

by THSM Contributor

Each year the movie industry makes some very valuable films that can be used to teach children. Over the last 70 years, these films have accumulated into a national cultural treasure. Continue reading »

A Place for Everything

by THSM Contributor

A very important aspect of being and staying organized is to have a place for everything. If you don’t have a place for everything, then it all starts piling up again and pretty soon you’re keeping everything because it’s hard to tell what’s what and what’s where. Here’s the scenario: You don’t have a home for anything and whenever the mail comes in or you go shopping, you just put the items wherever you find room. Pretty soon, you have a mess! Believe me, I know; I’ve been through it. Continue reading »

Time Management

by THSM Contributor

My husband said to me the other day, “I wish there were 26 hours in our day, then I could get everything accomplished!”I had to laugh because I myself had those thoughts; if we just had more time we could accomplish much more or at the very least we could actually get enough sleep! Continue reading »

A Mom’s Best Friends

by Mary Ann Kelley

As a busy mom, I have several "best friends" around the house that make my life easier and more enjoyable. Some are simple and free, others not so cheap, but all are things that I wouldn’t want to live without. Continue reading »

Top Ten Budget Busters

by THSM Contributor

Many people make sincere attempts to set up a household budget and get themselves together financially, but too often these attempts fail. And for those with the most difficult financial circumstances, it may take several attempts to finally create a plan that works. Continue reading »

Subdue Guilt About Art Instruction In Your Homeschool

by THSM Contributor

There are a number of things a homeschool family can do to subdue the guilt monster when he sneaks out from among the curriculum guides. The first thing we did was create a craft box. (Now, our crayons, colored pencils, markers, pencils, blank paper, scissors and glue sticks are such a part of our everyday school and afterschool life that I don’t include them as special art supplies.) I filled the box with all of the supplies that had previously been floating around the house. This included finger paints, water colors, pipe cleaners, felt and fabric swatches, buttons and brayers, the hot-glue gun, elmer’s brand glue, goggly eyes, stickers and old magazines. There is a surplus of craft-based idea books and websites to choose from so that you can best utilize these supplies. However, this only worked to squash the guilt for a short time. I was concerned about real art skills, not opportunities to make crafts. Continue reading »

Starting a Teen Book Study Group

by THSM Contributor

If you’re looking for a way to connect with your teenage daughter this summer, consider starting a girl’s book study group with your daughter and her friends. You may think that teens would not respond well to this idea, but think again. you just might be surprised. Continue reading »