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June 2015

by Mary Ann Kelley

Summer Fun Edition

From the Editor

Since June is when most homeschoolers are winding down and looking forward to a break, this issue I’m highlighting a few of our best blog posts for summer fun. We will be back again next month with a regular issue. Enjoy!

Warm regards,

Mary Ann Kelley
Editor

Teaching Calendar

June 11, 2015 — Great Barrier Reef Discovered – 1770

June 11, 2015 — District of Columbia Admission Day – 1800

June 12, 2015 — Anne Frank’s birthday – 1929

June 14, 2015 — Flag Day

June 14, 2015 — Oregon Admission Day – 1859

June 15, 2015 — Arkansas Admission Day – 1836

June 20, 2015 — West Virginia Admission Day – 1863

June 21, 2015 — New Hampshire Admission Day – 1788

June 21, 2015 — Father’s Day

June 25, 2015 — Virginia Admission Day – 1788

June 27, 2015 — Helen Keller’s birthday – 1880

June 28, 2015 — WWI began – 1914

June 30, 2015 — Meteor Day

July 1, 2015 — Canada Day

July 2, 2015 — Civil Rights Act of 1864

July 3, 2015 — Idaho Admission Day – 1890

July 4, 2015 — Independence Day

July 7, 2015 — Pinocchio first printed

View the entire calendar »

 

Seasonal Resources

Learning ABCs with rocks and trees

The Alphabet Walk: Learning ABCs with Rocks and Trees

Winter is a wonderful time to take Alphabet Walks with your children. In my part of the U.S., this means bundling up for the cold weather, but hunting for the ABCs in nature may be just the thing to get you and the kids moving on darker winter days.

The main object of an Alphabet Walk is to find letters that have been unintentionally formed in the outdoors. Perhaps crossing tree branches form an X against the blue sky, or a cat curved on your deck forms a perfect C. A front door wreath on your neighbor’s house is an O. The brickwork above the windows in an old Main Street building creates a V. Read More…

Free Audiobooks for Homeschooling

Where to Find Free Audiobooks for Homeschooling

LibriVox is a great online source for free audio books. This means you and the kids can listen to lots of well known classic fiction, nonfiction, and children’s books – at no cost – right from your personal computer, smart phone, or tablet, by either streaming or downloading the audio files. The books available on LibriVox are books whose copyright has expired, meaning LibriVox volunteers can record them without violating copyright laws, and you can listen without paying a purchase price. Read More…

How to Plan a Library Scavenger Hunt

How to Plan a Library Scavenger Hunt

A great activity for your homechool group or co-op is a library scavenger hunt. Working with your librarian, plan a gathering for homeschoolers that includes sending the kids throughout the library to find resources, so they’ll get to know the library better. If the scavenger hunt is promoted by the library, you might even find some more homeschooling friends in your community if they show up at the scavenger hunt. You can organize the kids into pairs or teams (and have the youngest kids hunt with an adult), and send them out with a list of things for each child to find or do in the library. A sample scavenger list might … Read More…

TheHomeSchoolMom: Summer Fun for Kids

20 Fun Things To Do During a Homeschooling Summer

Whether you school year ’round or take a break during the summer months, June, July, and August are the ideal time to jazz up your homeschooling with a bit of extra fun. Warm weather, sunshine, and summer breaks from regular-year activities all make the middle of the year perfect for a little excitement! Camps and swimming are pretty par-for-the-course for many families, but there are just so many things that homeschoolers can do to get the most out of summer and make some wonderful memories. Here are 20 fun ideas to get you started: Read More…

Recent Blog Posts

5 Myths About Homeschool Superiority

TheHomeSchoolMom: 5 Myths About Homeschool SuperiorityDespite being an ardent supporter of home education, I find myself consistently feeling obligated to set the record straight when it comes to claims of the vast superiority of homeschoolers. I’ve noticed a tendency of homeschool advocates commenting online to be elitist. I’m not sure many of the commenters are even homeschoolers themselves – I get the sense that they are just politically opposed to public schools – but regardless, it’s not helpful or accurate. If they are homeschoolers, I’m not sure if it is a defense mechanism, a lack of knowledge, or isolation from public school families, but I find it to be disingenuous and divisive. Read More…

Teen Tech Project: Building a Computer

TheHomeSchoolMom Blog: Teen homeschool technology projectThis week I visited with a homeschooling family whose son was anxiously awaiting his shipments from New Egg and Tiger Direct — full of the components he would assemble into his own PC.This brought back fond memories, since two of my three sons undertook this same project during their teen years, and my oldest actually did the same after he graduated. Read More…

Juggling Act: Homeschooling Multiple Grade Levels

TheHomeSchoolMom Blog: Homeschooling Multiple Grade LevelsWhat’s it like to educate siblings at home? I caught up with three Vermont homeschooling mothers who do just that. Meghan has six children, aged 11, 9, 7, 6, and eight month old twins. Michaeline’s children are 7 and 5, and she cares part-time for two additional children aged 2 and 1. Pam runs an in-home daycare for three children aged 4, 3, and 1 while homeschooling her own children, aged 13, 7, and 5. Read More…

How Challenges & Mistakes Promote Learning

TheHomeSchoolMom Blog: How challenges & mistakes promote learningInteresting problems and exciting risks are life’s calisthenics. They stretch us in directions we need to grow. Children are particularly oriented this way. They think up huge questions and search for the answers. They face fears. They puzzle over inconsistencies in what is said and done around them. They relentlessly challenge themselves to achieve social, physical, or intellectual feats that (from a child’s perspective) seem daunting. They struggle for mastery even when dozens of attempts don’t provide them any success. It’s a testament to courage that they continue to try. Read More…

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