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THSM Contributor

TheHomeSchoolMom is pleased to offer blog posts from many veteran homeschooling authors and contributors.

How Homeschooling Gave Me a Solid Career Foundation

by THSM Contributor

by Chris Sosa

“You were homeschooled?!”

I’m in my mid-20s and still encounter befuddled, concerned reactions when I mention my educational background. These same people, who seconds earlier considered me among their most well-adjusted friends and colleagues, now seem to be staring at me like I’ve just admitted I grew up locked in a cellar. Questions about whether homeschooling turned me into a traumatized recluse strike me as bizarre, since I have quite a public career. Continue reading »

Chris Sosa: I have a fantastic life and career, one that would’ve taken longer to achieve had I not been homeschooled. />

Successfully Navigating the College Admissions Process

by THSM Contributor

Despite all of the benefits of homeschooling, many students (and parents!) can feel apprehension when it comes time to apply for college. The college admissions process is not easy for anyone, but homeschooled students can put their best foot forward and know what to expect by following these tips. Continue reading »

TheHomeSchoolMom Blog: Homeschooling and the College Admissions Process />

The Problem of My Perpetually Undone “To Do” List (And What I Did About It)

by THSM Contributor

When my kids were little I’d make a list of things that needed to get done. Very rarely did I ever feel like I was accomplishing anything on the list, and almost always, I was correct — I did very rarely ever accomplish anything on the list. Continue reading »

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Challenges to Homeschooling High School

by THSM Contributor

Homeschooling a teen can be really hard. While I’m overall glad to be homeschooling, I have a high school age daughter who is difficult to work with and who is inconsistent in her approach to homeschooling. She has always been a challenging child, and as expected, the teen years have had a lot of turmoil. Homeschooling seems to catch a lot of blame for our problems — but it’s not from outsiders or family members. She spends a lot of time lamenting being homeschooled and blaming us for trapping her in home education — despite the fact that she has always had the option to attend school, an option we would have genuinely supported. Continue reading »

The Challenges of Homeschooling High School />

Homeschooling Can Change Your Life

by THSM Contributor

When we first heard about homeschooling, my husband and I thought it sounded like a great idea. Our first child had just been born, and like all new parents, we wanted only the best for her. Neither of us had been greatly impressed by our own school experiences, so we put homeschooling on our mental list of pursuits to consider someday. Continue reading »

TheHomeSchoolMom: Homeschooling Can Change Your Life />

Homeschooling for Safety

by THSM Contributor

This morning, my jaw dropped when I heard radio host Dennis Miller repeatedly tell a caller who was upset about the horrendous school shootings in Connecticut that he should consider pulling his young daughter out of school and homeschooling her. Miller was clearly serious.

I’m not used to hearing homeschooling being recommended by people like Dennis Miller, but in the wake of the awful event at Sandy Hook, I can see where shaken parents all over the country are looking at their children and thinking, “How can I protect them?” when dropping them off at school each day no longer looks like a safe thing to do.

I get that, and being as pro-homeschooling as I am, I agree. BUT, please know that homeschooling isn’t something you do impulsively. It requires serious thought. Most importantly, it requires at least one highly committed parent (ideally, two). Continue reading »

TheHomeSchoolMom: Homeschooling for Safety />

More Unschooling: The Beginner’s Guide to Unschooling, Part 3

by THSM Contributor

Unschooling: This isn’t a definitive resource guide — I don’t have the experience or knowledge to write that guide. Better people than I have written much more on the topic, and while I can’t provide a comprehensive list, I will share some books and sites to get you started (many are from Eva and my sister Kat). Continue reading »

The Beginner’s Guide to Unschooling />

Why Unschooling? The Beginner’s Guide to Unschooling, Part 2

by THSM Contributor

Why unschooling? Let’s think about what school is about: preparing kids for jobs (and life) in the future … a future that’s probably a decade or more away. Continue reading »

The Beginner’s Guide to Unschooling />

Guide to Unschooling for Beginners

by THSM Contributor

There’s nothing I get asked about more as a parent than unschooling, and nothing I recommend more to other parents. Continue reading »

The Beginner’s Guide to Unschooling />

How To Use A Microscope

by THSM Contributor

Using a microscope isn’t difficult. With a little precision and practice you’ll be a pro in no time. The key is to make small and careful movements as you make your way from larger to smaller. To understand these directions, you’ll need to be familiar with the parts of the microscope. Please download or print the diagram of a microscope before starting this tutorial. Keep in mind that using a microscope is a skill. You may have to stop the procedure and start over several times before you find your specimen. Keep at it, practice makes perfect! Continue reading »

How To Use a Microscope />

Dropping Out Was a Great Idea

by THSM Contributor

Lately, I’ve been hearing a lot of questions raised about how innovations in technology will change education as we know it – Can machines replace teachers? Do internet resources provide everything needed to develop professional skills? What happens if you replace school with online learning? I’ve spent my life trying to find out, and the answers I have are both promising and a little horrifying. Continue reading »

TheHomeSchoolMom: Dropping Out Was a Good Idea />

The Importance of Free Time

by THSM Contributor

Free time was once the hallmark of childhood. But these days, many parents feel it’s their duty to keep their children busy. This mindset can be found in parents who both work outside the home and need somewhere for the kids to go during off-school hours, parents who compete with other parents regarding whose child is the most “well-rounded,” parents who want to give their children every so-called “advantage,” and parents who believe their children will fall behind or get into trouble unless their schedules include every activity that can be crammed into each day. Continue reading »

TheHomeSchoolMom: The Importance of Free Time />

What is Memory and How Does it Work?

by THSM Contributor

Memory and Math: Multiplication – There comes a point where your times tables MUST be memorized. You want students to be able to instantly recall all of their math facts – faster than a calculator! Continue reading »

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What About College?

by THSM Contributor

Being the parent of 3 teens (and a 10 year old), I’ve been looking at the options I can give my kids for college. A priority for me was to be able to pay for college without having any of us take on debt. I really wasn’t sure if I was being reasonable. Then I stumbled upon the book Debt Free U by Zac Bissonnette. He put me on the road to charting a path through college that will meet my kids needs AND my financial goals. Continue reading »

Transcripts and Delight-Directed Learning

by THSM Contributor

Some people just aren’t textbook people! What do you do if your homeschooler learns by living, instead of studying textbooks? What if your child soaks up knowledge like a sponge, without being directed in any way? Can you still create a serious-looking high school transcript?

Continue reading »

Transcripts and Delight-Directed Learning />

Letting Go of Teaching

by THSM Contributor

“I always thought the idea of teaching was highly overrated. I was more interested that my kids learned.” ~Lee Binz

Stop Teaching and Start Learning – Do you sometimes long for an “escape from teaching?” I sure did, especially as my kids got a little older. The good news is that your days playing the “teacher” role will someday come to an end. Instead your role will evolve to that of a “learning facilitator.” Continue reading »

What’s Next? 8 Options After High School, Part 2

by THSM Contributor

Last month, we explored four of the traditional college options for what comes after homeschooling high school.  This month, we will continue our discussion by looking at four less-traditional options – options that are growing in popularity and should be explored with your teen.  I say four options, but really one of them is a path I would not recommend.  Read on to discover some of the roads less traveled for homeschool high school graduates.  You may discover a path that fits your family perfectly. Continue reading »

Writing Skills for Children – Better Story Starters

by THSM Contributor

‘You’re too early’ is probably not a phrase we use much with our kids. Wouldn’t we love it if they started studying for exams, packing for trips and planning Christmas presents early? However, when it comes to writing, kids often start early – and it is NOT a good idea. It probably means their writing moves too slowly and is full of padding. Continue reading »

What’s Next? 8 Options After High School

by THSM Contributor

Graduation is not an end, it’s a beginning. A starting point. A fork in the road. Which way will your children go? There are many options available! While in the midst of homeschooling high school, it’s a good idea to take a step back once in a while. Consider what is more important than the four years of high school. Consider what’s next. There are decisions to be made, and many options available. Discuss these options as a family, and talk about what will be best for your teen and your family. Continue reading »

Overwhelmed by Homeschooling and Life – Part 2

by THSM Contributor

In Part 1, I described some difficulties that come with homeschooling and how to handle them. Now I think I should also remind those newer to homeschooling of all the advantages of this lifestyle. When we began homeschooling, it was so nice for us to be able to stay in on a cold rainy day and read book after book while the neighbor kids stood out in the rain waiting for the bus. I remember my kids spending happy hours in the basement, using an easel my sister gave them to paint masterpieces while I put classical music on the tape player (“Peter and the Wolf” was a special favorite; I loved it because it introduced my children to the orchestra and the instruments used in it.) Continue reading »